Poetry

Iconography

A poem by Samuel Dickison

Humanity

A Meditation on Dirt

Making art is the redemption of dirt, and it can have healing power.

Visual Art

From the Roster: Santiago Escobar-Jaramillo

Escobar-Jaramillo uses participatory practices to bring reconciliation, to throw light on the lives of those across diverse regions of Colombia to try to make sense of the past.

Humanity

Thistledown

If anyone’s work is burned up, he will suffer loss, though he himself will be saved, but only as through fire.

Literature

Noteworthy: Clive James’s Life Sentence

The Australian poet and critic Clive James has just released two new books—a fine way to start a year when everyone thought you’d be dead.

Poetry

Today is one of those days.

A poem by Sarah Louise Garrido

Film & Television

The Babadook: The Horror We Must Face

A supernatural spin on a taboo affliction and the lonely island of grief

Humanity

Iteration

Creating Better Art through the Process of Revision

Visual Art

Representing Women in Contemporary Religious Painting

Bruce Herman’s QU4RTETS as Marian Typologies

Poetry

Barn Swallows

A poem by Amy Katherine Cannon

Literature

D.H. Lawrence and Discontent with the Modern World

Lawrence is the perfect picture of a man caught between two rival experiences of consciousness and the world it perceives.

Humanity

From the Archives: The Art of Baseball

It’s baseball season once more.

Poetry

Beauna

A poem by Jonathan McGregor

Humanity

Carrie & Lowell & Me

D.L. Mayfield on Forgiveness

Humanity

The Liquidation of Language

“Precision is, after all, not only a form of responsibility and a kind of pleasure, but an instrument of compassion. To be precise requires care, time, and attention to the person, place, or process being described.” – Marilyn Chandler McEntyre

Poetry

Scars & Empty Vases

A poem by Kevin Heaton

Poetry

A Friend Embraces Butoh

A poem by Ellen Foos

Film & Television

Leviathan: When Power Forfeits Law

In Leviathan, earthly powers trample the weak. But there is just enough in Leviathan to hint at a crack in the system, a brief glimmer of light that is enough to keep the downtrodden fighting for truth, justice, and love.

Humanity

Art as Hospitality

A dialogue between Harrell Fletcher and Leah Samuelson

Film & Television

The Voyeur’s Gaze

Everyone is a voyeur, and two recent films, Nightcrawler and Under the Skin, have something to teach us about what the act of watching means.

Literature

The Payoff

Geoffrey Sheehy on what it means to trust in a story’s payoff.

Poetry

Shimmer

A poem by Robert Hamilton

Literature

That Pure Exclusive Music

On Poetry and Memorization

Visual Art

From the Roster:  Konstantin Sergeyev

Sergeyev looks for ways in which groups, consciously or unconsciously, assert their uniqueness and define difference in contrast to mainstream American culture.

Poetry

Remain

A poem by Amy Orazio

Literature

Shirley Jackson and the Ordinariness of Evil

On a fear of conformity—the prospect of becoming someone else’s idea—that compelled Jackson to divulge not only the supernatural but the wickedness of the everyday.

Blog

Scottsdale: Exile

The final of Charles Carman’s five essays on Scottsdale, AZ

Humanity

Scottsdale: Memory

The fourth of Charles Carman’s five essays on Scottsdale, AZ

Humanity

Scottsdale: Tradition

The third of Charles Carman’s five essays on Scottsdale, AZ

Humanity

Scottsdale: Souvenirs

The second of Charles Carman’s five essays on Scottsdale, AZ

Humanity

Scottsdale: Art District

In a suburb of a desert city, a writer finds out what art, souvenirs, history, and memory mean to each other.

Music & Performing Arts

Ballet for the Young Folks

On Sufjan Stevens, Justin Peck, Wendy Whelan and the privilege of aging well with one of our most treasured cultural institutions

Poetry

Ash Wednesday

A Lenten poem by Chris Davidson

Humanity

Noteworthy: Diane Severin on Tinker Creek

May we who find ourselves in the suburbs live so deliberately.

Humanity

You Are What You Watch

In a world saturated with social media and instant video, discernment is relative and discretion is optional.

Humanity

The Cathedral of Junk

Exploring Our Ephemera on Three Levels

Film & Television

On Fairy-stories

Sorina Higgins on how Peter Jacksons’ Hobbit failed to render Tolkien’s three essential elements of good fantasy: Recovery, Escape, and Consolation.

Music & Performing Arts

Revisiting The Age of Adz: Dysfunctional Relationships in a “Noisy Age”

Why not round back just before the release of Stevens’ new album, Carrie & Lowell?

Poetry

Georgic

A poem by Vasiliki Katsarou

Film & Television

Iñárritu’s Illusions: The Cinematic Imagination of Birdman

Like all of Iñárritu’s other films, Birdman is meant to re-educate us in the dramatic interplay between the presence and absence, love and loss, fear and hope we experience in our own lives.

Humanity

Paint Louis

On Tibet’s Drepung Gomang’s monks visiting St. Louis’ annual riveside graffiti event

Poetry

A Little Lightning

A poem by Aaron Belz

Humanity

Safe as Houses

“…whatever you might do elsewhere,
In the time remaining, you might do here
If you can resolve, at last, to pay attention.” – Carl Dennis, “Drugstore”

Humanity

Plato at the Googleplex

Rebecca Goldstein’s newest offering Plato at the Googleplex dusts off the world’s best dialectician and matches his wits with the ideas and pseudo-ideas of contemporary culture.

Poetry

V62.89: Religious or Spiritual Problem

A poem by Carrie Purcell Kahler

Humanity

The Word Is Changing with Its World

Word makes world, and world makes word. To say that a truism is a truism is, itself, a truism.

Music & Performing Arts

A Mess of Help

Pop music, on its own terms, is often an ephemeral pleasure, but A Mess of Help: From the Crucified Soul of Rock N’ Roll shows us how to look at it and then through it to things that really matter, the words that could be, in so many songs, a message from outside our narrow selves, from someone who loves us.

Literature

The Wisdom of The Circle

In The Circle Dave Eggers reveals how present technological advances might be used in efforts to transcend current limits of what we know, what we hope for, what we must do, and what it means to be a human being.

Poetry

Affirmation of Faith

A poem by Kathryn Lester-Bacon…

Visual Art

From the Roster: Len Cicio

Len Cicio’s practice hinges on color, creating urban scenes and forging the structural forms of New York City in wax and color.

Visual Art

Urban Theater: New York in the 1980s

“All the world’s a stage, and all the men and women are merely players; they have their exits and their entrances, and one man in his time plays many parts.” As You Like It

Humanity

The Space Between

Finding grace in the liminal spaces…

Blog

Noteworthy: On Selma

On Scott Tobias’ entry at Dissolve

Humanity

The Pacific North Wet

Chasing after things that glow…

Poetry

All the Morning Birds

A poem by Vito Aiuto

Humanity

A Good Deed is a Naughty Word

China’s Ban on Wordplay

Film & Television

Stephen Colbert: A Requiem

What was The Colbert Report?

Poetry

Afternoon Walk

A new poem by Fredric Koeppel.

Humanity

Another Hemisphere’s Stars

We all need other faces, other lives to throw ourselves into.

Film & Television

Haunted Loves

A Girl Walks Home Alone at Night is a love story, albeit a scary one. And the beautiful adventure of love Amirpour portrays is one where the person beside you may be different than you imagined. They may be much stronger, they may destroy you, and you may destroy them.

Humanity

The Formula in our Stories

The trouble comes when fitting one’s life into a story becomes a formula.

Poetry

New

A poem by Dawn Trook, well-suited for the day.

Humanity

Psalms for Ferguson | The Wise

Innocent question:
Where is the child?

Visual Art

Georgia O’Keeffe: One View

…it wasn’t until I experienced for myself the extent of the repetition and revision of painting the same few objects over and over again—the bones, the flowers, the mountains, the doors—that I understood the collective effect of a long career and close collaboration in not only documenting, but defining a place and time.

Poetry

Nativity

…by John Donne

Film & Television

Why We All Need It’s A Wonderful Life

In this all-time American classic, we find a man who doesn’t seem very American at all.

Visual Art

From the Roster: Joyce Yu-Jean Lee

Joyce Yu-Jean Lee creates video installations, photographs, and performances that examine how societies have historically depicted concepts of enlightenment.

Film & Television

The Knights of Terrence Malick

“With the help of their wings they could fly away to distant regions, blessed regions, where they really had their homes, for here they were but alien sojourners.”—Soren Kierkegaard

Humanity

What We Loved in 2014: Part II

This is part two of our editors and staff writers sharing the books, movies, or music they loved in 2014.

Humanity

What We Loved in 2014: Part I

Instead of a “best of” list we asked our editors and staff writers to share the books, movies, or music they loved in 2014. The selections did not have to be current.

Poetry

QUANDARY OF THE BIG STICK

A poem by Andrew McAlpine

Poetry

The Migration of Robert Hass’s Poetry

“There are moments when the body is as numinous /as words, days that are the good flesh continuing.” -Robert Hass

Poetry

Psalms for Ferguson| BlackLivesMatter

A Litany of Lament and Hope

Humanity

The Discovery Itself Calls forth Further Quests

Adam Joyce, our Editor-in-Chief, answers the question: what is criticism?

Humanity

Psalms for Ferguson | Ad(vent) Nauseum

This is the first in a series of prayers and poems, titled “Psalms for Ferguson,” that Curator will be publishing over the next few weeks.

Poetry

Some days are an empty bolt…

A poem by J. Marcus Weekley

Film & Television

The Purest of Lines: Isao Takahata’s Final Bow

Despite its tenth-century trappings, The Tale of the Princess Kaguya is a film made with eyes firmly fixed on the troubles of contemporary Japanese life and the deep slide of the Japanese Miracle into the dreary doldrums of the Lost Two Decades.

Visual Art

From the Roster: Beñat Iglesias Lopez

“I feel it is not my responsibility to tell stories through my work but to present the necessary elements so people can build their own.” — Beñat Iglesias Lopez

Humanity

A House for Birds

“Maybe we all dream of being God, the god who breaches dams, moves houses suddenly, erects bridges, decides where forests will be and who will die.” -Rebecca Sonlit

Film & Television

Interstellar, Science Fiction and the Odyssey of Love

Interstellar extends the tradition of science fiction films that underscore the moral condition of the human within a technologically savvy narrative, and it is the antithesis of Alfonso Cuarón’s Gravity.

Blog

Noteworthy: Is Art Up to the Task?

A little internet fodder for tonight’s dinner table chat ‘n chew.

Poetry

Fasting

A poem by Shiaw-Tian Liaw

Music & Performing Arts

CALL FOR PAPERS: Festival of Faith and Music

We’re excited to announce a new partnership with Calvin College’s Festival of Faith and Music to solicit academic papers that will subsequently be published on the site.

Literature

Mad Men, Snickering and Sobbing

Without a Stitch in Time, a recently released collection of Peter De Vries’ short stories, reminds of the American male at mid-century.

Visual Art

From the Roster: Justin K. Sorensen

“I have the impression that I may be inspecting a large area only eventually to exclude it from conversation.” — Ludwig Wittgenstein, Culture and Value

Film & Television

Thoughts on Citizenfour

Absent a flashy visual style, Citizenfour may seem like an easy movie to make, but Laura Poitras’ “privileged access” to Edward Snowden reminds viewers that the pursuit of this controversial story was propelled by her strong ideology and her uniqueness, unteachable in film school.

Humanity

Forty

“Tell me, what is it you plan to do with your one wild and precious life?”—Mary Oliver

Visual Art

From the Roster: David Kendall

Steeped in the tradition of the flâneur, David Kendall explores how spatial, economic and design initiatives, as well as participatory practices, can combine to encourage social and spatial interconnections or reveal dissonance in cities.

Film & Television

What is so Scary About The Walking Dead?

Watching The Walking Dead through the categories of existential and ethical horror reflects what we are scared of when we turn off the television and accounts for why we seek out the scares in the first place.

Humanity

Beauty, Art, and My Five-Year-Old Daughter

In this broken world, we need more than images of beauty to comprehend Beauty Itself.

Film & Television

Marriage (and Black Holes)

Portraying the life of celebrated cosmologist Stephen Hawking, the new biopic, The Theory of Everything, raises questions about the age-old conundrum of how to reconcile science and religion.

Humanity

Overheard from the Overhead Projector

With a name like ‘transparency,’ why do you have so much to hide?

Film & Television

Dear White People: Identity in the Post-Obama Era

Dear White People takes the perennial themes of college-age identity confusion, exploration, and belonging and places them in the context of a post-Obama America.

Poetry

The Neighbors

A poem by Elizabeth McMunn-Tetangco

Visual Art

From the Roster: Jeremy Grant

This Tuesday our feature covers Colorado-based mixed-media, assemblage artist Jeremy Grant.

Humanity

The Barbershop

Democratic, yet class-haunted—as all the service professions are—political, but neutral ground, you can talk about anything in a barbershop, even in Tajikistan. And while you’re sitting there, everyone else is doing the same thing, everywhere around this planet. Sitting, safe for the moment, ready for the blade.

Film & Television

If You’re an Artist, Wayne White Understands

The subject of Beauty is Embarrassing, lifelong artist Wayne White, is farther down the road than most of us and he can and can tell us how he got there.

Poetry

Mythelectric

A poem by Phillip Aijian

Blog

The Well Said Yes

Meet Adam Joyce, our newly appointed Editor-in-Chief

Visual Art

From the Roster: Jay Walker

Jay Walker is a Philadelphia based multi-disciplinary artist- creating tape installations, mixed media painting/drawings, and carved sculptures.

Poetry

Look at Your Money

Trevor Logan in conversation with Michael Robbins

Film & Television

A Broken Person Taking Care of Broken People

The Overnighters is a fascinating new documentary portrait of Pastor Jay Reinke and the laborers of the fracking boomtown of Williston, ND.

Poetry

Grease Poet

A poem by Richard King Perkins II

Literature

Welcome to Trace Italian

John Darnielle’s new novel Wolf in White Van dispenses its existentialism in small but clearly marked doses.

Music & Performing Arts

In Conversation with Lecrae

Charles Carman and Lecrae caught up on art, regionalism, double speak and empathy on the recent Phoenix stop of his Anomaly tour.

Visual Art

From the Roster: Stephanie Imbeau

Rebecca Locke on Stephanie Imbeau’s site-specific sculpture and installations

Literature

Letters from Fairyland

With the recent publication of Italo Calvino’s letters, we can learn how he wanted his work in fiction to “subtract weight,” to relieve human burdens.

Poetry

The Girl Who Liked Scary Movies

A poem by Glen Armstrong

Visual Art

The House Shows Project

Elizabeth Dark Wiley’s interview with Andrew Hendrixson…

Film & Television

Saint Fred

“You can ask a lot of questions about the world and your place in it. You can ask about people’s feelings; you can learn the sky’s the limit.”

—Fred Rogers, “Did You Know?”

Blog

David Foster Wallace: In His Own Words

on the new audiobook from Little, Brown Publishers

Blog

Handset

A poem by Timothy E.G. Bartel

Humanity

CTRL-F Mindset

“We can be knowledgeable with other man’s knowledge, but we can’t be wise with other man’s wisdom.” ~ Montaigne

Humanity

Stores as Magic Places

Furtive buying in solitude, or in the company of a favorite friend, is the only kind of buying I would permit in an ideal world.

Humanity

The Roaches Of Matrimony

I tremble to contend.

Poetry

Glass Forest

A.J. Huffman’s poem after the Dale Chihuly installation Glass House, 1971

Literature

Stepping Outside

Layne Hilyer on fear, failure and exile in the works of Roberto Bolaño

Literature

Roberto Bolaño: Never Kill a Child

A review of Monica Maristain’s new book Bolaño: A Biography in Conversations, an interweaving of biographical narrative and interviews conducted with Bolaño, a man of contradictions, both farouche and loving.

Film & Television

Why Pick the Old Bones?

In a violent world, violence is inherent to truth telling.

Poetry

Spider

A poem by Joel Looper

Visual Art

Art for Everyone

ArtEverywhereUS.org answers: what about those for whom exposure to art isn’t readily available, or those whose negligible or nonexistent interest in art prevents them from seeking out opportunities to view it?

Visual Art

Winogrand: Pre-selfie Street Photographer

Madison Peace’s reflection on multiple visits to the Gary Winogrand retrospective at the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Poetry

END SOLO

A poem by Stacey Tran

Humanity

Working Classes

Philip Levine and Studs Terkel on the meaning of labor.

Music & Performing Arts

On Good Folk, Good Land

Charles Carman’s quick chat with Ben Hardesty, lead singger of VA folk outfit The Last Bison.

Music & Performing Arts

In Celebration of Esoteric Spectacle: Operatic Observations

My wider life experiences—Bugs Bunny and History of Italian Opera and hating piano lessons and studying art history and and being ashamed of my elitism and being fiercely protective of the possibilities of art—don’t displace my experience of opera: they augment it.

Music & Performing Arts

It’s Opera Season

If you had a habit like that, a pleasurable habit, but without the cost or cancer, a habit that wouldn’t kill you, a habit whose only downside was that it prevented you from enjoying opera, you’d keep it, right?

Poetry

Him and She

A poem by Amanda Ryan

Literature

I Know What You Read this Summer

Reader, rescue yourself—don’t click on the lists.

Literature

David Bentley Hart’s The Experience of God

Evidence for or against God, if it is there, saturates every moment of the experience of existence, every employment of reason, every act of consciousness, every encounter with the world around us.

Poetry

Summer Sijo 3

A poem by Timothy E. G. Bartel

Film & Television

Quotidian Magic

By skirting the momentous events of childhood and allowing its gaze to rest gracefully on the quotidian, Boyhood evokes what is wondrous and memorable in everyday life.

Humanity

The Ice Bucket Challenge

The world that ought to be ought to be a world without diseases.

Carrie Givens’ personal story of ALS and how, though the #IceBucketChallenge’s mode of promoting ‘awareness’ seems superficial, she’s glad for it.

Poetry

Baggage

A poem by Marjorie Maddox

Visual Art

Andrew Wyeth Painted Me Home

“I think one’s art goes as far and as deep as one’s love goes. I see no reason for painting but that. If I have anything to offer, it is my emotional contact with the place where I live and the people I do.” ~ Andrew Wyeth

Film & Television

Bearing New Images

The hope of Hayao Miyazaki as discussed in Turning Point: 1997-2008, a collection of translated interviews, public statements, essays, etc., compiled from the years he directed Princess Mononoke, Spirited Away, and Howl’s Moving Castle.

Blog

Awe, Alarm, and Hope

In which we remind you, as an arts publication, that these times of anguish are also of hope…

Film & Television

Jim Jarmusch: Expect the Unexpected

This deflation of expectations is Jarmusch’s stock and trade: for his myopic outsiders and befuddled innocents, simple survival often replaces wish fulfillment as the immediate goal.

Poetry

Proserpine

You said how often pleasure reads as loss—

Humanity

Beauty at Session House

… though beauty has saved and will save, beauty will also destroy the world.

Visual Art

From the Roster: Nicole Marie Mueller

…pursuing a balance of chaos and control in repetitious patterns

Humanity

Certain Tides

We build our lives, it seems, on the narrowest speculation of possibility; we make our homes on the edge of an island on the verge of erosion.